Fellows Roundtables

FELLOWS ROUNDTABLES

 

The Fellows started roundtable forums to discuss topics of the day and issues involving the practice of law. It is hoped that there will continue to be four or more luncheon or dinner meetings each year, in each of the four regions of the state. Twenty to thirty Fellows attend each forum, and a Fellow, in collaboration with one or more discussion leaders, moderates the conversation. To date, there have been seventeen roundtables.  Click here to view our Fellows Roundtable Catalogue.

 

 


A Roundtable Discussion

 

Ethical Considerations for Lawyers:

Limits of Free Speech in the Age of Social Media

November 21, 2019

6:00 – 8:00 p.m.

Testo’s Restaurant

1775 Madison Avenue

Bridgeport, CT

 

Space is limited - click here to register

ICYMI, the First Amendment is trending. The legal profession is challenged every day by this new context for established rules. Consider: Are lawyers’ social media posts subject to the Rules of Professional Conduct including the rules regulating lawyer advertising? Can online bullying become criminal harassment? When should you, and can you, limit your clients’ comments on social media about litigation? Can a true threat be posted via disappearing content?

Join us for a discussion on the moving target that is free speech and the ethical pitfalls facing lawyers in the age of social media.

Facilitator

Associate Justice of the Connecticut Supreme Court

Steven Ecker

 

Panelists
Attorney David Atkins, Pullman & Comley, LLC

Superior Court Judge Gerald Harmon

 

Co-Hosts

Jane Grossman                                                                     Auden Grogins

Superior Court Judge                                                            Superior Court Judge

 

This event will take place from 6:00 - 8:00 p.m. at Testo’s Restaurant, 1775 Madison Avenue, Bridgeport, CT. Participation is limited to the first 25 people to register. There will be a buffet dinner. Gluten-free, vegetarian, vegan and other options are available. Please indicate your dietary restrictions upon registration.

 

Space is limited so check your calendar and register online here. Registration will be open until filled, but no later than November 15, 2019. Please contact us at ctbf [at] cbf-1 [dot] org with any questions. The cost of attendance is $45.00 with a cash bar. Your payment will also assist in covering the cost of dinner for any law students participating in Roundtables. We cannot accept cancellations within 72 hours of the event due to the catering guarantee.

 

Attorneys admitted in Connecticut may claim up to

.5 CT Ethics and 1.5 CT General CLE hours for attending this event.


A Roundtable Discussion

 

A View from the Other Side

Wednesday, October 16, 2019

6:00 - 8:00 p.m.

Old Tolland County Courthouse

53 Tolland Green

Tolland, CT

 

Imagine making wrong choices in your life that result in a 10-15 years sentence in federal prison on drug offenses. What lessons would you learn and what choices would you make in the future?

 

 Vance "Kali" Barnes has been through this situation and since getting out of prison, he has worked with Judge Janet Bond Arterton, the judge who sentenced him, in her "Support Court". Kali is now the director of the Salvation Army's Sport Fellowship Program and together with Emilson "Ching" Joseph, who also served time, are dedicated to interventional activities with at-risk young people.

 

 

Kali and Ching produce YouTube videos, some of which are quite raw, under the moniker "Bishop and the Juice Crew." Their objective is to gain the respect of at-risk youth, help them understand the nature and consequences of their interactions with the police, courts, and correction system, and to gain credibility for their message from two individuals who have "been through the system." In 2019, Kali and Ching won the Urban Web Series Award in New York City for their vignette "Red Carpet."

 

In their personable and laid back style, Kali and Ching are willing to share their views and stories with Fellows at this Roundtable. Please join us for a dynamic and informative conversation that will challenge the way we see things, the assumptions we make, and the beliefs we hold.

 

Facilitators

Vance "Kali" Barnes

Emilson "Ching" Joseph

 

Co-Hosts

Hon. Michael Riley (Ret.)

Pullman & Comley, LLC

 

Allenston Sheridan, Jr.

Diana, Conti & Tunila, LLP

 

Kathy Bach

Tolland Historical Society

 


A Roundtable Discussion

 

The Business of Law

Monday, October 7, 2019

6:00 - 8:00 p.m.

Janet M. Blumberg Hall, UConn School of Law

55 Elizabeth Street

Hartford, CT

All lawyers, regardless of setting, need to understand and appreciate the “business of law” including bringing in revenue, cutting costs, overhead, marketing, and strategic and financial planning. This occurs whether you are in private practice, in-house counsel or working for a non-profit. It is something lawyers need to be aware of and think about whether they are solo practitioners, working in a small, mid or large size firm, or employed in other settings. This Roundtable brings together different types of legal/business leaders from managing partners to executive directors to in-house counsel to talk about how lawyers/law students can better understand and incorporate the same into their practice and the associated ethical implications.

 

Facilitators

Garlinck Dumont, Solo Practitioner, Dumont Law LLC

Rosemary Giuliano, Managing Partner Giuliano Richardson & Sfara LLC

Raymond Hassett, Founding Partner Hassett & George, PC

 Moy Ogilvie, Managing Partner, McCarter & English, LLP, Hartford Office

Justine Rakich-Kelly, Executive Director, The Children’s Law Center of Connecticut

An-Ping Hsieh, Visiting Professor from Practice and Former General Counsel, Hubbell, Inc.

 

Co-Hosts

Cody N. Guarnieri

Brown, Paindiris & Scott, LLP

                       

 

 

Bryan J. Orticelli

Day Pitney, LLP

 

 


Roundtable Discussion

 

Representing Clients with Mental Health Conditions

June 25, 2019
6:00 – 8:00 p.m.
Tony D’s Restaurant
92 Huntington Street
New London, CT

In the U.S., 43.8 million adults experience mental illness in a given year and approximately 1 in 5 youth aged 13–18 has a severe mental disorder at some point during their life. This Roundtable considers what lawyers need to know in representing clients with mental health conditions, the challenges such clients face in finding and keeping employment, obtaining housing, and dealing with the life stresses all of us face. Leaders will be lawyers from the Connecticut Legal Rights Project (www.clrp.org), who work with such clients all the time.
 

Facilitators/Hosts
 

Kirk Lowry
Connecticut Legal Rights Project

Dwight H. Merriam
Attorney at Law


Roundtable Discussion

The Rule of Law:
What Is It and What Is Our Ethical And Moral Duty In Preserving It?

May 15, 2019
6:00 – 8:00 p.m.
Angellino’s Restaurant
346 Kelly Road
Vernon, CT

What is the Rule of Law? Is it only about the judiciary and the need for adherence to uphold and accept rulings of courts? Or does it go beyond and extend to a much more important role – the role of the balance of powers of the three branches of our government? 

Over the past 2-3 years, we have seen an unprecedented attack on the Rule of Law.

Join our distinguished panel of facilitators in exploring what role we, as attorneys must play in preserving the respect of the judiciary - both ethical and moral - not just because it is our bread-and-butter, but because it is fundamental in preserving our Constitution and our very way of life and the freedoms our constitution was designed to preserve.

Facilitators

Hon. Barry F. Armata
Superior Court of Connecticut

Hon. William H. Bright, Jr.
Appellate Court of Connecticut

Hon. Hope C. Seeley
Superior Court of Connecticut

Jonathan M. Shapiro
Shapiro Law Offices LLC

Hon. Dawne G. Westbrook
Superior Court of Connecticut


Hosts

Timothy J. Johnston
Balskus & Johnston LLC

Mark D. Leighton
Leighton Katz & Drapeau

 


Roundtable Discussion

 

Limited English Proficiency

April 23, 2019
6:00 – 8:00 p.m.
Quinnipiac School of Law
370 Bassett Road
North Haven, CT

Imagine that you are stepping into a courthouse with a lot at stake: perhaps you are facing eviction, or fighting to keep custody of your children or seeking protection from family violence. For a successful outcome, you need to fill out forms, navigate court procedures and effectively communicate the facts of your case to the court. Now imagine that virtually every person working in that courthouse - from the marshals at the front door to the Judge - speaks a language that you do not understand, speak or write.

What assistance is currently available to ensure meaningful access by Limited English Proficiency (LEP) parties in court and at administrative hearings? Are there LEP populations who are not accessing the legal system in the first place, and how do we address that gap? As lawyers, how can we most effectively serve LEP parties? 
 

Facilitators

 

Maggie I. Castinado|
Connecticut Public Defender’s Office

Sandra L. Fair
Statewide Legal Services

Jason M. Fragoso
US Department of Veterans Affairs

Hon. Maria Araujo Kahn
Supreme Court of Connecticut

Cecil J. Thomas
Greater Hartford Legal Aid 


Hosts

 

Susan Garcia Nofi
 

Professor Marilyn J. Ford
Quinnipiac University School of Law


Roundtable Discussion

Representing Clients with Mental Health Conditions

 

April 2, 2019
6:00 – 8:00 p.m.
Testo’s Restaurant
1775 Madison Avenue
Bridgeport, CT

 

In the U.S., 43.8 million adults experience mental illness in a given year and approximately 1 in 5 youth aged 13–18 has a severe mental disorder at some point during their life. This Roundtable considers what lawyers need to know in representing clients with mental health conditions, the challenges such clients face in finding and keeping employment, obtaining housing, and dealing with the life stresses all of us face. Leaders will be lawyers from the Connecticut Legal Rights Project (www.clrp.org), who work with such clients all the time.
 

Facilitators/Hosts
 

Kirk Lowry
Connecticut Legal Rights Project

Dwight H. Merriam
Attorney at Law

 


Roundtable Discussion

Did You Hear The Story Of…?
 

Roundtable Discussion
March 21, 2019
6:00 – 8:00 p.m.
Golf Club of Avon
160 Country Club Road
Avon, CT

 

Lawyers are known to spin a good tale from time to time.  But what makes for a good story? And how do lawyers tell that story in a way that listeners -- judges, juries, the press, and clients -- understand and relate to? Come to this Roundtable Discussion, spearheaded by several lawyers and a judge who are among the best, to talk about the Art of Storytelling -- the tricks, the challenges, the successes and yes, the failures. 

Facilitators:

James W. Bergenn
Shipman & Goodwin LLP

 

Judge David P. Gold
Superior Court of Connecticut

Rosemarie Paine
Jacobs & Dow LLC 

 

Hosts:

Cody N. Guarnieri
Brown, Paindiris & Scott, LLP

Christopher P. Kriesen
The Kalon Law Firm, LLC

Daniel A. Schwartz
Shipman & Goodwin LLP


Roundtable Discussion

 

THE USE AND ABUSE OF SOCIAL MEDIA
BY CLIENTS AND ATTORNEYS

 

March 7, 2019
6:00 – 8:00 p.m.
The Willimantic Brewing Company

967 Main Street
Willimantic, CT

 

Use of social media is an evolving area that raises issues related to both our professional and personal lives.  How can we use social media effectively and appropriately in our practices?  How can we educate our clients about the proper use of social media and the potential impact on their legal matter?  Do we need to be careful about what we might post on a personal blog or our personal Facebook page?  These issues are especially challenging with the constant changes in technology and protocols for social media use.  Please join us for a frank discussion about these topics!

 

Facilitators:

Brendon Levesque
Horton, Dowd, Bartschi & Levesque, P.C.

Attorney Elizabeth Rowe
Assistant Bar Counsel
CT Statewide Grievance Committee

Michaeal Taylor
Horton, Dowd, Bartschi & Levesque, P.C.

 

Host:

Tracie Molinaro
St. Onge & Brouillard

 


Roundtable Discussion
 

Taking Care of Adult Children
Who Cannot Take Care of Themselves

 

Re-Scheduled
Roundtable Discussion 
Wednesday, December 12, 2018
6:00 p.m. - 8:00 p.m.
The Hartford Club
Hartford, CT

 

There are many adults with intellectual disabilities in Connecticut still living with elderly parents, who have spent most of their adult lives advocating for their children.  Every budget cycle, it seems like these parents are seen on TV and in newspapers camping out at the Capitol, seeking an increase, or more recently, trying to fend off drastic cuts in funding.  Have you ever wondered why this situation is repeated?  In other words, is there a systemic problem?  We hear about a safety net, but specifically how does Connecticut care for adults with disabilities?  In times of decreasing tax revenues and competing interests, what is our State’s responsibility?  Please join us for a discussion about Connecticut’s programs and resources and how they compare to resources in other States.  With the input and perspective of parents, advocates, experts and others in the area, we intend to address the situation as it exists now and, with that as background, hope to explore or at least identify possible ways to move forward. 

 

Facilitators include:
 

  • Elaine Buchsbaum, Chair of the New Jersey Council on Developmental Disabilities  
  • Hon. Peter Buchsbaum, New Jersey Superior Court Judge (Ret.)
  • Rep. Jay M. Case, Ranking Member of the Human Services Committee
  • Melissa Gagne, Rome Clifford Katz & Koerner, LLP, 
    Member of the Central CT Assoc of Retarded Citizens
  • Sharon Pope, Czepiga, Daly, Pope & Perri

Co-Hosts:
 

Attorney Patrick Klingman

Attorney Dwight H. Merriam

 


Roundtable Discussion

 

Getting a Grip on Gender
 

December 5, 2018
6:00 - 8:00 p.m.
Angellino’s Restaurant
346 Kelly Rd, Vernon, CT 06066

 

It used to be so simple then… Men/ Women/ Boys/Girls (or so it seemed).  Now? Cisgender, transgender, non-binary, genderqueer, gender fluid, gender creative ... what?  Gender Identification, Orientation. Internal/ external ideas of sexuality now are a part of the conversation and ability to identify and relate to someone. What does it mean and what do our words and preconceptions do to affect our ability to relate to people who see themselves in a different way than we do? Why is the idea of the sexuality taking on such significance in our country’s national dialogue? Bring your appetite and your curiosity as we explore the whole new world (and language) of gender and the meaning and significance of the same. 

 

Please join us in a discussion with Fellows, members of the community, court system, and bar to talk about this evolving topic.

 

Facilitators include:

True Colors Executive Director, Robin McHaelen

And individuals who identify across a spectrum of gender identities

Co-Hosts
 

Attorney Timothy J. Johnston
Balskus & Johnston   

Attorney Mark D. Leighton
Leighton, Katz & Drapeau

Judge Dawne G. Westbrook
Connecticut Superior Court

 


Roundtable Discussion

 

Mindfulness at Work

October 29, 2018
5:30 p.m. - 8:00 p.m.
The Delamar Southport
275 Old Post Road
Southport, CT

 

Feeling tired and stressed out?  Need to find some peace in your life?  Join us as we explore the many benefits of Mindfulness. Deborah Barnett-Brandt, the owner of b2 Mindfulness Studio in Weston, Connecticut and a mindfulness coach since 2011, will lead us in a discussion on the practice of Mindfulness, its historical origins, as well as the latest neuro science of why we need it and how it works to create more clarity, peace and patience in peoples’ busy lives. The beauty of this practice is that you do not have to have any experience to begin to achieve these results – you need only to have an open and curious mind. Prior to dinner, Ms. Barnett-Brandt will lead us through several short practices so that you can experience the benefits of Mindfulness. Judge Alex Hernandez and Attorney Fred Ury will also share with us their personal benefits of a healthy body and mind. 
 

Facilitators
 

Deborah Barnett-Brandt, Owner, b2 Mindfulness Studio

Hon. Alex Hernandez, Superior Court of Connecticut

Attorney Fred S. Ury, Ury & Moskow LLC 

 

Co-Hosts
 

Attorney Kristin B. Mayhew    
McElroy, Deutsch, Mulvaney & Carpenter, LLP
30 Jeliff Lane
Southport, CT 06890

Attorney Sheryl A. Shaughnessey
Law Office of Sheryl Shaughnessey
87 Ruane Street
Fairfield, CT 06824    

 


Roundtable Discussion

 

Brave New World:

What will Artificial Intelligence do to the practice of law:

Is it a Blessing or a Curse?
 

Tuesday, October 9, 2018 
6:00 p.m. - 8:00 p.m.

Janet M. Blumberg Hall 
University of Connecticut School of Law
55 Elizabeth Street
Hartford, CT

 

Artificial Intelligence (“AI”) and Machine Learning have the potential to transform law firms and the legal sector. But how are they doing that? While some see AI as replacing and disrupting the careers of future lawyers, others see it as an area of promise that will create innovative and efficient ways for lawyers to conduct research, control costs, communicate with clients, market their practice, and manage business. This Roundtable will provide a forum for discussion of how AI and other legal technologies are changing the practice of law. Will legal technologies like AI give lawyers a better way to practice? Will they allow more people access to legal resources and achieve better outcomes? Will they provide opportunities for employment and practice development? Are they susceptible to bias and manipulation that could affect outcomes? Or will they relegate lawyering to an antiquated profession? Please join us for an enlightening and engaging conversation of the future of our profession.

Facilitators include:
 

Joseph V. DeMarco, DeVore & DeMarco LLP

Jessica de Perio Wittman, University of Connecticut School of Law

Clifford E. Nichols, Day Pitney, LLP

Frederic S. Ury, Ury & Moskow, LLC

 

Co-Hosts:

Hon. Barry F. Armata
Connecticut Superior Court
Tolland J.D. Courthouse
69 Brooklyn Street
Rockville, CT 06702

Assistant Dean Karen DeMeola
University of Connecticut
School of Law
55 Elizabeth Street
Hartford, CT 06105-2290

Dean Timothy S. Fisher
University of Connecticut
School of Law
55 Elizabeth Street
Hartford, CT 06105-2290

 

 


Roundtable Discussion

Is Mediation Your Best Option to
Create Value for Your Client?

September 13, 2018
6:00 - 8:00 p.m.
The Hartford Club
46 Prospect Street

 

Please join some of the most respected mediators in Connecticut for a discussion on the ways mediation is a best option for resolving disputes, the role of a mediator and approaches he/she employs, and how you can better represent your client at a mediation. This program will also discuss some of the issues with mediation and creative ways to overcome them.

 

Facilitators include:

 

Hon. Barbara D. Aaron, Connecticut Superior Court

Peter W. Benner, Founder, Benner Resolutions and Healthcare Dispute Resolutions Group LLC

Hon. Lynda B. Munro [Ret.], Partner, Pullman & Comley LLC

James K. Robertson, Jr., Partner, Carmody Torrance Sandak & Hennessey LLP

Christopher F. Wanat, Partner, Milano & Wanat, LLC

Co-Hosts

Christopher P. Kreisen
The Kalon Law Firm, LLC
140 Huyshope Avenue, Suite 405
Hartford, CT 06106
(860) 249-0979 x 700
ckriesen [at] kalonlawfirm [dot] com

Andrea Barton Reeves 
HARC President and CEO
900 Asylum Avenue
Hartford, CT 06105

(860) 218-6000
abartonreeves [at] harc-ct [dot] org

 


Roundtable Discussion

THE TRAJECTORY OF THE LAW
 LEGAL EDUCATION: PAST, PRESENT and FUTURE

June 28, 2018
6:00 - 8:00 p.m.

At America’s First Law School:
The Tapping Reeve House and Museum
82 South Street
Litchfield, Connecticut

 

Hundreds of surviving Litchfield Law School notebooks chronicle the legal education which shaped the formative years of our republic. More than 1,100 individuals from 13 states and territories were educated here, among them three future Supreme Court Justices, two future vice-presidents, 28 future U.S. Senators, and 101 future members of the U.S. House of Representatives. From contracts to statutory construction to actions for the seduction of a daughter, the curriculum from 1774 until 1833 was reflective of the times and no less comprehensive than that which might be found today.
 

Join us as we canvass the past, assess the present and contemplate the future of legal education in the age of acceleration. Our facilitators from Columbia and Yale have spent countless hours reading and analyzing the Litchfield notebooks to obtain a granular understanding of what was taught there and why. Deans Fisher and Saxton will share perspective from the front lines of legal education today, and all of us will explore what the future of legal education may hold in store.
 

As we learn how the ingredients of legal education have changed over time, we will discuss what may change as the education for our venerable discipline adapts to a rapidly changing world. We hope you will be able to join us as we bring together a panel of learned experts to facilitate a provocative and lively conversation.

Facilitators include:

Dean Timothy S. Fisher, UCONN School of Law

Whitney Bagnall, Retired Librarian, Columbia University School of Law

Professor and Dean Emeritus Brad Saxton, Quinnipiac School of Law

Michael Widener, Rare Book Librarian, Yale Law School

 

Co-Hosts

                       

Hon. Barry F. Armata
Connecticut Superior Court

Hon. Anne C. Dranginis (Ret.)
Pullman & Comley LLC

Hon. Andrew W.  Roraback
Connecticut Superior Court


 Roundtable Discussion

The Making and Shaking of the Adolescent Brain:

What Neuroscience Tells Us about its Care and Maintenance,

and the Legal Impact of the Same

 

June 5, 2018
6:00 - 8:00 p.m.
Angellino’s Restaurant
346 Kelly Road, Vernon, CT

 

When do people become adults and how does it affect their legal rights? The law says you are an adult at age 18. You are not mature enough to drink alcohol until age 21. Yet, certain criminal statutes allow someone to be treated as an adult sooner than even age 18. Psychologists, psychiatrists and studies claim the male brain doesn’t mature until age 25, females sooner. We are seeing young adults exhibit immature behavior that affects them in the criminal setting. How does social media, civil settings, family settings and the court system affect this? Does the shooter at Stoneman Douglas High School support the theory?  Does the reaction of some of the students in the aftermath challenge this and demonstrate that many adolescents have far better judgment than “mature” adults?

Is it more neuroscience than upbringing? Is the move away from a punitive correctional model to a community-based rehabilitative model effective? Have the courts (Miller/Graham/Roper) caught up with neuroscience and the fast evolution of social media/mass, instantaneous communications of adolescents?

Join us in a discussion and debate with members of the community, court system, bar members, and medical field to tackle this evolving subject.

 

Facilitators include:

Attorney Jessica Audet

Dr. Patricia Christiana

Judge Edward C. Graziani

 

Co-Hosts

Attorney Timothy J. Johnston            Attorney Mark D. Leighton                Judge Dawne G. Westbrook

Balskus & Johnston                            Leighton, Katz & Drapeau                 Connecticut Superior Court

                       

 


  Battling Bias or Infringing on Free Speech?

A Roundtable Discussion about
ABA Model Rule 8.4 and its Implications for Lawyers

 

April 18, 2018
6:00 - 8:00 p.m.

Quinnipiac University School of Law
Pondview Room
370 Bassett Road
North Haven, CT 06473

 

What do you know about Model Rule of Professional Conduct 8.4, which the ABA has proposed as follows:

It is professional misconduct for a lawyer to:

 (g) engage in conduct that the lawyer knows or reasonably should know is harassment or discrimination on the basis of race, sex, religion, national origin, ethnicity, disability, age, sexual orientation, gender identity, marital status or socioeconomic status in conduct related to the practice of law. This paragraph does not limit the ability of a lawyer to accept, decline or withdraw from a representation in accordance with Rule 1.16. This paragraph does not preclude legitimate advice or advocacy consistent with these Rules.

 

Join us for discussion to learn about the rule and how it could affect you and your practice.  How does this line up with First Amendments rights? What does it really mean in practice?  Should the Rule be adopted in Connecticut? Our facilitators will share their thoughts and elicit yours for a night of lively discussion on this controversial topic.

 

Facilitators include:

Karyl L. Carrasquilla, Chief Disciplinary Counsel

Richard E. Hayber, Hayber Law Firm

Patricia King, Geraghty & Bonnano, LLC

Hon. Kimberly A. Knox, Judge, Connecticut Superior Court

Tracie Molinaro, St. Onge & Brouillard

 

Co-Hosts:

Lawrence J. Fox, George W. and Sadella D. Crawford Visiting Lecturer in Law, Yale Law School

Jennifer G. Brown, Dean and Professor of Law, Quinnipiac University School of Law

 


Transgender People and The Law

 

Roundtable Discussion 
November 14, 2017
6:00 - 8:00 p.m.
Eli’s On Whitney Restaurant

Hamden, CT

 

Imagine how you would feel if you were misunderstood, maligned, and marginalized by much of society. As the transgender community becomes more pronounced and visible, we need to examine how we understand transgendered individuals and the journeys they have undertaken, the issues they face in dealing with the law and society, the prejudices they feel and the triumphs they teach. Please join us for a night where we listen and discuss their journeys and understand the challenges and victories that transgender people face.

 

Facilitators include:

Attorney Beck S. Fineman, Ryan Ryan Deluca LLP

Professor Jennifer L. Levi, Western New England University School of Law

Hon. Maureen M. Murphy, Connecticut Superior Court

Deputy Director Dalia Panke, Judicial Branch Support Enforcement Administration 

Attorney Alix Simonetti, Commission on Human Rights and Opportunities

 

Co-Hosts:

Hon. Barry F. Armata
Connecticut Superior Court
       J.D. & G.A. 4 Courthouse
400 Grand Street
Waterbury, CT 06702

Attorney Rachel Goldberg   
123 Harbor Drive, Unit 201  
          Stamford, CT 06092           

                                                                  
 Justice Andrew J. McDonald
Connecticut Supreme Court
231 Capitol Avenue
Hartford, CT  06106

 

 


 Lawyers and the Use of Judgment –

Counseling vs. Advocacy;

Controlling Client Expectations

 

Roundtable Discussion 
September 27, 2017
6:00 - 8:00 p.m.
Angellino’s Restaurant

Vernon, CT

 

This roundtable discussion led by Judge William J. Bright will start with the examination of the relationship between Sections 2 and 3 of the Rules of Professional Conduct.  Is a lawyer a counselor or an advocate?  Do we as lawyers owe our clients the wisdom we have gleaned from years of practice? Or, do we as lawyers owe our clients the same zealous advocacy of their position we strived for as newly minted members of the bar?

Is it our job as lawyers to control our client’s expectations?  Should we intentionally be pessimistic with our chances at trial, or give low settlement expectations so the client is more likely to accept a negotiated settlement? 

Is there an inherent conflict with our position as officers of the Court and our duty to expedite litigation under Rule 3.2 (i.e. strive for settlement to free up Judicial resources) and our duty to zealously advocate our client’s position?

If most cases are negotiated, does the Judicial Department have any duty to insure that the playing field is level?

 

            Please join us for dinner and a discussion of the questions led by: 

            The Honorable William J. Bright

 

            And assisted by:

Timothy J. Johnston of Balskus & Johnston

Mark D. Leighton of Leighton, Katz & Drapeau

 

 


The Grass is Greener…or is it?

Roundtable Discussion 
September 13, 2017
6:00 - 8:00 p.m.
UCONN School of Law
Janet M. Blumberg Hall
Hartford, CT

 

Have you ever heard the following?  “Attorneys in private practice make more money.”  “Public Service attorneys work shorter hours and have positions that come with big pensions and benefits.”  “In-house lawyers have easier jobs because they don’t have to deal with the pressures of maintaining a private practice.”  “Attorneys who work for non-profit organizations have low stress, feel good jobs.” Join us for a discussion of different types of practices and assumptions that we make about the various types of legal lifestyles: public service, in-house counsel, private practice, and working for a non-profit organization.

 

Facilitators include:

Kathy M. Flaherty, Connecticut Legal Rights Project

Gail P. Hardy, State’s Attorney for Hartford

Kristen M. Marcroft, Freed Marcroft LLC

Hon. Tammy T. Nguyen-O’Dowd, Superior Court of Connecticut

Bryan J. Orticelli, Day Pitney LLP

John J. Phillips, Barings, LLC

José A. Santos, United Technologies Corporation

Alexis N. Smith, New Haven Legal Assistance

Amy Wergeles, Henkel Corporation

Edward Wilson, Office of the Attorney General

Gayle C. Wintjen, Oak Hill

Anne Kelly Zovas, Strunk Dodge Aiken Zovas LLC

 

Co-Hosts:

Hon. Barry F. Armata
Connecticut Superior Court   

J.D. & G.A. 4 Courthouse 
400 Grand Street
Waterbury, CT 06702  
203.236.8200

Susan Garcia Nofi
Central West Justice Center
One Monarch Place, Suite 350
Springfield, MA 01144
413.686.9050

 


Exit Strategies

Roundtable Discussion

June 15, 2017

6:00 - 8:00 p.m.

Mory’s

New Haven, CT

 

This Roundtable will be of great interest to lawyers of all ages. Early and mid-career lawyers struggle to make orderly transitions to new positions.  They are also rightly concerned about older lawyers and their winding down.  They can learn from how those older lawyers make these changes.

 

As lawyers come to the end of their practice and careers, many have a hard time talking about their exit strategies and expectations as they phase out of full time practice.  Many firms and senior partners find it difficult to plan for succession and to be forthcoming about what the expectations are for those who are leaving and those who are staying.  At this roundtable, we will talk about how to have those uncomfortable conversations, what all the stakeholders expect, what they may fear, and how lawyers decades from their own retirement can help and learn from the experience of senior lawyers in transition. Please join us for a stimulating conversation about this difficult but important topic.

 

      Facilitators:

·         Dr. Sidney Horowitz, Connecticut Resource Group, LLC

·         Judi M. Keppelman, Robinson & Cole LLP

·         Bruce Louden, Louden, Katz & McGrath, LLC

·         John Rose, Jr., Corporation Counsel, City of New Haven

·         Mark G. Sklarz, Green & Sklarz LLC

·         Elizabeth J.  Stewart, Murtha Cullina, LLP

 

 

Co-Hosts:

 

Dwight H. Merriam                                                                Barbara S. Miller

Robinson + Cole                                                                   Brody Wilkinson PC

280 Trumbull Street                                                              2507 Post Road

Hartford, CT 06103                                                               Southport, CT 06890   

860.275.8228                                                                        203-319-7133

dmerriam [at] rc [dot] com                                                                bmiller [at] brodywilk [dot] com 
 


And Justice For All?

Can We Make Access to Justice a Reality?

Roundtable Discussion 

February 22, 2017
6:00 - 8:00 p.m.
Quinnipiac University School of Law
North Haven, CT

 

A fundamental tenet of American society is that all individuals stand equal before the law. For many people, navigating the waters of a complex legal system is, at a minimum, a daunting task. For others, the prospect of facing the rapids alone serves as a complete barrier to obtaining necessary services and protecting individual rights. 

Please join us to discuss the recommendations published December 15, 2016 in the Connecticut General Assembly’s Report of the Task Force to Improve Access to Legal Counsel in Civil Matters.

Does this Report serve as the life raft that we need, or are Connecticut’s citizens who cannot afford their own lawyers going to have to continue to sink or swim alone?

 

Discussants included:  Task Force Members Dean Jennifer Brown, Connecticut Legal Services Deputy Director Deborah Witkin, and New Haven Legal Assistance Executive Director Alexis Smith, Connecticut Legal Rights Project Executive Director Kathy Flaherty, Greater Hartford Legal Aid Staff Attorney Cecil Thomas

 

This Roundtable was co-hosted by Quinnipiac University School of Law

Chapter of Phi Alpha Delta, and several law students participated.


 "Can You Just Listen?”

 

Roundtable Discussion
January 24, 2017
6:00 p.m.
Peppercorn's Grill
Hartford, CT

As we reflect on the election results and the divisiveness of our country, people are saying we need to listen to one another.  But can we?  What is the difference between listening and hearing?  Do we listen to respond or listen to understand?  In these times of interruption and “let me finish”, can we truly open our minds (and hearts) to the thoughts and feelings of those we are engaged with.  How do we listen: actively and with open mind, or are we formulating a response back?  Has this inability to truly listen to one another affected our legal system, our society, our policies, our safety?  How do we teach other to listen and what does listening truly mean? Please join members of the bench, communication experts, and community leaders for a lively discussion on a topic that is both professionally and personally relevant and to just listen to each other.  

 
Facilitators:
 

Representative David Baram

Judge Leo V. Diana

Representative Rosa Rebimbas

Justice Richard A. Robinson

Dr. Elizabeth S. Thayer

 

Regional Co-Hosts:

Barbara Aaron, Esq.

Berman, Bourns, Aaron & Dembo, LLC
664 Farmington Avenue
Hartford, CT 06105

Telephone: 860.232.4471
Baaron [at] westhartfordlaw [dot] com

                       

Kim L. Duell, Esq.

Law Offices of Kim L. Duell
81 Wethersfield Ave, # 3
Hartford, CT 061114 

Telephone: 860.522.4025
kim [at] kimduell [dot] com


The Art of the Legal Blog

 

Roundtable Discussion

January 18, 2017

6:00 p.m.

Republic at the Linden

Hartford, CT

Many lawyers are creating blogs as a means of marketing, commenting on areas of practice, cases or events, getting their views out there, etc., but does it work and what are some things a lawyer should consider when entering this domain?  Will it be read?  If so, by whom? What are the ethical considerations? Does it generate business? Is it worth the effort?  Could it come back to haunt you?  Please join us for a lively discussion on this relevant, personal and work required topic.

Facilitators:

Attorney Meghan Freed, Freed Marcroft, LLC 

Attorney Daniel Schwartz, Shipman & Goodwin, LLP

                      Attorney Regina Von Gootkin, Brown, Paindiris & Scott, LLP

                      Attorney Bruce Stanger, Stanger & Associates, LLC

 

Regional Co-Hosts:

Meghan Freed, Esq.

Freed Marcroft, LLC
419 Main Street
Hartford, CT 06103
Telephone: (860) 560-8160
meghan [at] freedmarcroft [dot] com

Barry F. Armata, Esq.

Brown, Paindiris & Scott, LLP
100 Pearl Street
Hartford, CT 06103
Tel: (860) 522-3343
barmata [at] bpslawyers [dot] com


     

 

The Happy Lawyer:

A Myth or a Real Possibility?

presented by

Connecticut Bar Foundation
James W. Cooper Fellows

and

Quinnipiac University School of Law

 

It can almost seem like an oxymoron to some lawyers to suggest that lawyers can be “happy.” When we look more deeply at the concept, however, then we can unpack the mystery of why so many lawyers are chronically unhappy and unfulfilled and why others are, indeed, satisfied and fulfilled.

This Roundtable started with a look at the recent book, “The Happy Lawyer: Making a Good Life in the Law” by Nancy Levit and Douglas Linder (Oxford, 2010). CBF Fellow Professor Carolyn Kaas and two current Quinnipiac Law students presented the research findings and conclusions from the book. From an examination of the science of human happiness and from studies of lawyers in various practice settings, the authors suggested various strategies for boosting career happiness. Among other things, they suggested that finding happiness requires examining and understanding  our own personality types, values, strengths, and interests.  

Lawyers at different stages of their careers were asked to respond and to give their opinions on the book’s findings, and from their own experiences, on how they have -- or haven’t -- achieved satisfaction. This lead to a candid and productive discussion among all of the participants to help all of us chart pathways to improved quality in our professional lives.


For information on the latest roundtable: please contact the CBF at ctbf [at] cbf-1 [dot] org or 860.722.2494.